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Sunday, January 31, 2010

BUYcott alert: Support Costco

Costco is being targeted by 'Palestinian' supporters for selling Israeli products.
Please support Costco’s ongoing sale of Israeli goods. Costco stores in the United States have been targeted for anti-Israel action. Please visit your local Costco and – if available – purchase Israeli products, such as Israeli clementines and Ahava beauty products. Please consider contacting Costco to express your support for purchasing products from Israel.

Together we can make a difference!
Indeed.

If only we had a local Costco here....

17 Comments:

At 1:06 AM, Blogger Sunlight said...

Ooooh! I didn't know Costco carried Ahava! I ran out of the Ahava I bought at the Dead Sea (after rinsing off all that mud!) and ordered some online. I'll have to check for it at our local Costco. Good news!

 
At 1:56 AM, Blogger NY Nana said...

I use Ahava hand and also the foot cream, but order it from Israel. We belong to Costo, and have not seen Israeli products in the 4 that my husband goes to, except recently they have started carrying Emek Light Edam cheese near us. Hubby says that they also carry some Ahava, but not what I use. 2 are near us, and 2 are near our kids. He will make a careful look next time he goes. What he did find at BJ's, which is very much like Costco, are superb bed sheet sets made in Israel. We have 2 sets now. It was quite a surprise to find! For Pesah, both carry Israeli products.

And this year is the first time that Israeli mangoes (Carmel) are in a local supermarket, ShopRite. Excellent! We have a Trader Joe's about 5 minutes away, and hubby makes sure to look for Israeli products. There was no boycott, happily, in our local Trader Joe's,nor the ones our kids go to.

Most of the supermarkets do have Israeli products, luckily. We live in the metro NYC area, in the suburbs.

 
At 2:45 AM, Blogger NormanF said...

BDS at the moment is of an irritant than a threat. It can be countered and defeated. Support Israel!

 
At 12:33 PM, Blogger Chakratronic said...

A couple years ago, we saw Costco selling Keter plastic tool sheds for considerably less than they were going for in Israel...

 
At 5:49 PM, Blogger Tatyana said...

Years ago before visiting Israel I got a set of cute pajamas for my nephew. We had a good laugh when we realized it was made in Israel.
I never paid attention to where things come from but now I will. And will check out Ahava at my Costco!

 
At 8:25 PM, Blogger renag said...

Look who is calling the "kettle black"...how ironic...

 
At 3:19 AM, Blogger simon said...

Is the world just plain stupid?
An interesting questionnaire for Palestinian Advocates
By Yashiko Sagamori

If you are so sure that " Palestine , the country, goes back through most of recorded history," I expect you to be able to answer a few basic questions about that country of Palestine :


1. When was it founded and by whom?


2. What were its borders?


3. What was its capital?


4. What were its major cities?


5. What constituted the basis of its economy?


6. What was its form of government?


7. Can you name at least one Palestinian leader before Arafat?


8.. Was Palestine ever recognized by a country whose existence, at that time or now, leaves no room for interpretation?


9. What was the language of the country of Palestine ?


10. What was the prevalent religion of the country of Palestine ?


11. What was the name of its currency? Choose any date in history and tell what was the approximate exchange rate of the Palestinian monetary unit against the US dollar, German mark, GB pound, Japanese yen, or Chinese Yuan on that date.


12. And, finally, since there is no such country today, what caused its demise and when did it occur?


You are lamenting the "low sinking" of a "once proud" nation.. Please tell me, when exactly was that "nation" proud and what was it so proud of?


And here is the least sarcastic question of all: If the people you mistakenly call "Palestinians" are anything but generic Arabs collected from all over -- or thrown out of -- the Arab world, if they really have a genuine ethnic identity that gives them right for self-determination, why did they never try to become independent until Arabs suffered their devastating defeat in the Six Day War?

I hope you avoid the temptation to trace the modern day "Palestinians" to the Biblical Philistines: substituting etymology for history won't work here.


The truth should be obvious to everyone who wants to know it. Arab countries have never abandoned the dream of destroying Israel ; they still cherish it today. Having time and again failed to achieve their evil goal with military means, they decided to fight Israel by proxy. For that purpose, they created a terrorist organization, cynically called it "the Palestinian people" and installed it in Gaza , Judea, and Samaria . How else can you explain the refusal by Jordan and Egypt to unconditionally accept back the "West Bank" and Gaza , respectively?


The fact is, Arabs populating Gaza, Judea, and Samaria have much less claim to nationhood than that Indian tribe that successfully emerged in Connecticut with the purpose of starting a tax-exempt casino: at least that tribe had a constructive goal that motivated them. The so-called "Palestinians" have only one motivation: the destruction of Israel , and in my book that is not sufficient to consider them a nation" -- or anything else except what they really are: a terrorist organization that will one day be dismantled.


In fact, there is only one way to achieve peace in the Middle East . Arab countries must acknowledge and accept their defeat in their war against Israel and, as the losing side should, pay Israel reparations for the more than 50 years of devastation they have visited on it. The most appropriate form of such reparations would be the removal of their terrorist organization from the land of Israel and accepting Israel's ancient sovereignty over Gaza , Judea, and Samaria . That will mark the end of the Palestinian people. What are you saying again was its beginning?

 
At 3:38 AM, Blogger shaya said...

I am sure that we Jews as a group spends much more money at Costco that any of boycott groups do, and now we should make sure that we shop at Costco twice as much and buy as many Israeli products as possible. ISRAEL FOREVER, NEVER FORGET.

 
At 9:31 PM, Blogger Michael said...

It is most disturbing to see that the free world is being blackmailed and intimidated into submitting to Muslim wishes. Europe, a once proud Europe, no longer exist and now it's being replaced by a soon majority Muslim population who spew hatred, kill, maim, intimidate and force it's will on the "infidel" population of the world.

This sad European trend is trying to duplicate itself here in the United States - unless we, Jews or not, discard the Political Correctness way of dealing with the issue and stamp it out because we, Jews or not, are all in the same boat with this menace called Radical Islam.

We never shopped at Costco before, now we will use Costco as our primary shopping source and purchase as many Israeli products as we can.

 
At 9:34 PM, Blogger Michael said...

It is most disturbing to see that the free world is being blackmailed and intimidated into submitting to Muslim wishes. Europe, a once proud Europe, no longer exist and now it's being replaced by a soon majority Muslim population who spew hatred, kill, maim, intimidate and force it's will on the "infidel" population of the world.

This sad European trend is trying to duplicate itself here in the United States - unless we, Jews or not, discard the Political Correctness way of dealing with the issue and stamp it out because we, Jews or not, are all in the same boat with this menace called Radical Islam.

We never shopped at Costco before, now we will use Costco as our primary shopping source and purchase as many Israeli products as we can.

 
At 7:12 PM, Blogger Sandra said...

And what are the Palestinians replacing these products with? They create nothing but trouble.

 
At 5:10 PM, Blogger Sergio said...

I am not Jewish, never was, and chances are never will be. Neither am I a member of fifty other diverse cultures. I have no axe to grind with any of them but I associate in general with those groups with whom I share basic values like democracy and personal freedom. And I get really ticked off when some violent fringe group who cannot force their agenda upon others through rational discourse or even through orchestrated terrorism try to dignify their campaign by waging economic war on people of a kindred spirit.

So let me add my voice to the multitude and say that I support Costco’s (have been a member for 3+ years) and Trader Joe’s selling products from the only democratic country in the Middle East, and that I would in a heartbeat terminate my patronage if they were to succumb to the coercion of the Muhammadan boycott.

 
At 3:14 AM, Blogger Eryrcoedengoch said...

I dunno. Costco has already done some things that lead me to believe they are going anti-Semitic. They've stopped selling Kosher brands in the food court (Hebrew National or Sinai 48 were featured, depending on the store) and they're no longer selling Noah's Bagels in the bakery section and the ones they are selling are loaded up with HFCS (pure poison -- banned in most countries). Gotta wonder.

 
At 1:24 AM, Blogger ThahbiaNafe Nafe said...

In the name of Allah, the Most Beneficient, Most Merciful.

Retrieved from: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palestine

1. The Greek word Palaistinē (Παλαιστίνη, Palaistine) is generally accepted to be a translation of the Semitic name for Philistia; however another term – land of the Philistieim (γῆ τῶν Φυλιστιεἰμ, transliteration from Hebrew ארץ פלשתים 'Eretz Pəlishtím, land of the Philistines) – was used in the Septuagint, the second century BCE Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, to refer to Philistia. In the Torah / Pentateuch, the term Philistia is used 10 times and its boundaries are undefined. The later Historical books (see Deuteronomistic history) include most of the biblical references, almost 200 of which are in the Book of Judges and the Books of Samuel; in these cases, the word refers to the lands around the several Philistine city-states along the Mediterranean coast, west of the Judean mountains, from Gaza in the south to Ekron in the north.

During the Byzantine period, the entire region (Syria Palestine, Samaria, and the Galilee) was named Palaestina, subdivided into provinces Palaestina I and II. The Byzantines also renamed an area of land including the Negev, Sinai, and the west coast of the Arabian Peninsula as Palaestina Salutaris, sometimes called Palaestina III. The Arabic word for Palestine is فلسطين (commonly transcribed in English as Filistin, Filastin, or Falastin). Moshe Sharon writes that when the Arabs took over Greater Syria in the 7th century, place names that were in use by the Byzantine administration before them, generally continued to be used. Hence, he traces the emergence of the Arabic form Filastin to this adoption, with Arabic inflection, of Roman and Hebrew (Semitic) names. Jacob Lassner and Selwyn Ilan Troen offer a different view, writing that Jund Filastin, the full name for the administrative province under the rule of the Arab caliphates, was traced by Muslim geographers back to the Philistines of the Bible. The use of the name "Palestine" in English became more common after the European renaissance. It was officially revived by the British after the fall of the Ottoman Empire and applied to the territory that was placed under the Palestine Mandate.

 
At 1:26 AM, Blogger ThahbiaNafe Nafe said...

2. The boundaries of Palestine have varied throughout history. The Jordan Rift Valley (comprising Wadi Arabah, the Dead Sea and River Jordan) has at times formed a political and administrative frontier, even within empires that have controlled both territories. At other times, such as during certain periods during the Hasmonean and Crusader states for example, as well as during the biblical period, territories on both sides of the river formed part of the same administrative unit. During the Arab Caliphate period, parts of southern Lebanon and the northern highland areas of Palestine and Jordan were administered as Jund al-Urdun, while the southern parts of the latter two formed part of Jund Dimashq, which during the ninth century was attached to the administrative unit of Jund Filasteen (Arabic: جند فلسطين‎).

The boundaries of the area and the ethnic nature of the people referred to by Herodotus in the 5th century BCE as Palaestina vary according to context. Sometimes, he uses it to refer to the coast north of Mount Carmel. Elsewhere, distinguishing the Syrians in Palestine from the Phoenicians, he refers to their land as extending down all the coast from Phoenicia to Egypt.[55] Pliny, writing in Latin in the 1st century CE, describes a region of Syria that was "formerly called Palaestina" among the areas of the Eastern Mediterranean.

Since the Byzantine Period, the Byzantine borders of Palaestina (I and II, also known as Palaestina Prima, "First Palestine", and Palaestina Secunda, "Second Palestine"), have served as a name for the geographic area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. Under Arab rule, Filastin (or Jund Filastin) was used administratively to refer to what was under the Byzantines Palaestina Secunda (comprising Judaea and Samaria), while Palaestina Prima (comprising the Galilee region) was renamed Urdunn ("Jordan" or Jund al-Urdunn).

Nineteenth-century sources refer to Palestine as extending from the sea to the caravan route, presumably the Hejaz-Damascus route east of the Jordan River valley. Others refer to it as extending from the sea to the desert. Prior to the Allied Powers victory in World War I and the Partitioning of the Ottoman Empire, which created the British mandate in the Levant, most of the northern area of what is today Jordan formed part of the Ottoman Vilayet of Damascus (Syria), while the southern part of Jordan was part of the Vilayet of Hejaz. What later became part of British Mandate Palestine was in Ottoman times divided between the Vilayet of Beirut (Lebanon) and the Sanjak of Jerusalem.

The Zionist Organization provided its definition of the boundaries of Palestine in a statement to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. On the basis of a League of Nations mandate, the British administered Palestine after World War I, promising to establish a Jewish homeland.

The Palestinian National Charter describe the boundaries of the "homeland of the Arab Palestinian people" as those of Mandate Palestine excluding the Transjordan.

 
At 1:27 AM, Blogger ThahbiaNafe Nafe said...

3. Jerusalem

4. Jerusalem, Gaza, Safed, Nablus, Ramla, and Hebron,

5. Out of a total population of about 300,000 souls, between a fifth and a quarter lived in those six towns. A general picture of the economy also projects the remainder consisted mainly of peasants, living in villages of varying size, and engaged in agriculture. Their main food-crops were wheat and barley in that order, supplemented by leguminous pulses, olives, fruit, and vegetables. In and around most of the towns there was a considerable number of vineyards, orchards, and vegetable gardens.

6. In the middle of the 1st century it was governed under Ottoman rule, i.e. 1550 AD after conquests by the Ummayads and Abbasids

7. Salahiddin
Palestine was conquered by the Islamic Empire, beginning in 634 CE. In 636 CE, the Battle of Yarmouk during the Muslim conquest of Syria marked the new Muslim hegemony over the region, which was classified as Bilâd al-Shâm (Greater Syria). The majority of the population was Christian and was to remain so until the conquest of Saladin in 1187.

8. Yes. i.e. Egypt, Syria, and Arabia

9. Aramaic and later Arabic

10. (Woo'Woo'.) ISLAM

11. Shekels, Dinariis and Palestinian Pounds:
Also check the links below for more up to date images and approximate info. on the currency.
(http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mill_(British_Mandate_for_Palestine_currency,_1927).jpg. Shows an image of 1927 currency used under the Palestine Mandate). AND
( http://israelvisit.co.il/beged-ivri/shekel/teachings/kadman.htm)

12. And Finally, since Palestine has always existed and so does Allah no matter how hard you try to change the Spelling on things :

The Israeli-occupied territories of Palestine are the territories occupied by Israel during the Six-Day War of 1967 from Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. They consist of the West Bank, including East Jerusalem; much of the Golan Heights; the Gaza Strip, though Israel disputes this and argues that since the implementation of its disengagement from Gaza in 2005 it no longer occupies the territory; and, until 1982, the Sinai Peninsula. The West Bank and Gaza Strip are also referred to as the Palestinian territories or Occupied Palestinian Territory. The Palestinian Authority, the EU, the International Court of Justice, the UN General Assembly and the UN Security Council consider East Jerusalem to be part of the West Bank and occupied by Israel; Israel considers all of Jerusalem to be its capital and sovereign territory.


In answer to the bonus question below all of the other unnecessary ones... :

During the Bronze Age, INDEPENDENT Canaanite city-states were established, and were influenced by the surrounding civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Phoenicia, Minoan Crete, and Syria. During 1550–1400 BCE, the Canaanite cities became vassals to the Egyptian New Kingdom who held power until the 1178 BCE Battle of Djahy (Canaan) during the wider Bronze Age collapse.

Fahahaha. Peace

 
At 1:27 AM, Blogger ThahbiaNafe Nafe said...

3. Jerusalem

4. Jerusalem, Gaza, Safed, Nablus, Ramla, and Hebron,

5. Out of a total population of about 300,000 souls, between a fifth and a quarter lived in those six towns. A general picture of the economy also projects the remainder consisted mainly of peasants, living in villages of varying size, and engaged in agriculture. Their main food-crops were wheat and barley in that order, supplemented by leguminous pulses, olives, fruit, and vegetables. In and around most of the towns there was a considerable number of vineyards, orchards, and vegetable gardens.

6. In the middle of the 1st century it was governed under Ottoman rule, i.e. 1550 AD after conquests by the Ummayads and Abbasids

7. Salahiddin
Palestine was conquered by the Islamic Empire, beginning in 634 CE. In 636 CE, the Battle of Yarmouk during the Muslim conquest of Syria marked the new Muslim hegemony over the region, which was classified as Bilâd al-Shâm (Greater Syria). The majority of the population was Christian and was to remain so until the conquest of Saladin in 1187.

8. Yes. i.e. Egypt, Syria, and Arabia

9. Aramaic and later Arabic

10. (Woo'Woo'.) ISLAM

11. Shekels, Dinariis and Palestinian Pounds:
Also check the links below for more up to date images and approximate info. on the currency.
(http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mill_(British_Mandate_for_Palestine_currency,_1927).jpg. Shows an image of 1927 currency used under the Palestine Mandate). AND
( http://israelvisit.co.il/beged-ivri/shekel/teachings/kadman.htm)

12. And Finally, since Palestine has always existed and so does Allah no matter how hard you try to change the Spelling on things :

The Israeli-occupied territories of Palestine are the territories occupied by Israel during the Six-Day War of 1967 from Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. They consist of the West Bank, including East Jerusalem; much of the Golan Heights; the Gaza Strip, though Israel disputes this and argues that since the implementation of its disengagement from Gaza in 2005 it no longer occupies the territory; and, until 1982, the Sinai Peninsula. The West Bank and Gaza Strip are also referred to as the Palestinian territories or Occupied Palestinian Territory. The Palestinian Authority, the EU, the International Court of Justice, the UN General Assembly and the UN Security Council consider East Jerusalem to be part of the West Bank and occupied by Israel; Israel considers all of Jerusalem to be its capital and sovereign territory.


In answer to the bonus question below all of the other unnecessary ones... :

During the Bronze Age, INDEPENDENT Canaanite city-states were established, and were influenced by the surrounding civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Phoenicia, Minoan Crete, and Syria. During 1550–1400 BCE, the Canaanite cities became vassals to the Egyptian New Kingdom who held power until the 1178 BCE Battle of Djahy (Canaan) during the wider Bronze Age collapse.

Fahahaha. Peace

 

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